Going to bed, I’ll be answering any asks I get in regards to the prompts tomorrow morning ❤️ good night guys

thevirginharry:

remember swine flu reblog if ur a tru 2009 kid

tarynel:

thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?August 25, 2014
Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.
He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.
And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:
I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.
I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:
I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.
But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.
"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.
"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"
Her voice trailed off.
Angry?
She nodded.
"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."
The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.
But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.
Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.
"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."
We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.
"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."
What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?
"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."
The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.
"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."
He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.
"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.
"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"
Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.
Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.
"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

In the alley, on hot, rainy afternoon, three men sweated through their suits. They weren’t politicians or cable TV screamers. They were detectives working a heater case.

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.
I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?
Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.
"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."
Source
Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

Omg

tarynel:

thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?
August 25, 2014

Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.

He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.

And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:

I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.

I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:

I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.

But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.

"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.

"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"

Her voice trailed off.

Angry?

She nodded.

"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."

The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.

But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.

Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.

"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."

We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.

"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."

What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?

"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."

The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.

"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."

He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.

"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.

"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"

Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.

Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.

"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.

I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?

Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.

"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."

Source

Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

Omg

  • 1. Are looks important in a relationship?

  • 2. Are relationships ever worth it?

  • 3. Are you a virgin?

  • 4. Are you in a relationship?

  • 5. Are you in love?

  • 6. Are you single this year?

  • 7. Can you commit to one person?

  • 8. Describe your crush

  • 9. Describe your perfect mate

  • 10. Do you believe in love at first sight?

  • 11. Do you ever want to get married?

  • 12. Do you forgive betrayal?

  • 13. Do you get jealous easily?

  • 14. Do you have a crush on anyone?

  • 15. Do you have any piercings?

  • 16. Do you have any tattoos?

  • 17. Do you like kissing in public?

  • 20. Do you shower every day?

  • 21. Do you think someone has feelings for you?

  • 22. Do you think someone is thinking about you right now?

  • 23. Do you think you can last in a relationship for 6 months and not cheat?

  • 24. Do you think you’ll be married in 5 years?

  • 25. Do you want to be in a relationship this year?

  • 26. Has anyone told you they don’t want to ever lose you?

  • 27. Has someone ever written a song or poem for you?

  • 28. Have you ever been cheated on?

  • 29. Have you ever cheated on someone?

  • 30. Have you ever considered plastic surgery? If so, what would you change about your body?

  • 31. Have you ever cried over a guy/girl?

  • 32. Have you ever experienced unrequited love?

  • 33. Have you ever had sex with a man?

  • 34. Have you ever had sex with a woman?

  • 35. Have you ever kissed someone older than you?

  • 36. Have you ever liked one of your best friends?

  • 37. Have you ever liked someone who your friends hated?

  • 38. Have you ever liked someone you didn’t expect to?

  • 39. Have you ever wanted someone you couldn’t have?

  • 40. Have you ever written a song or poem for someone?

  • 41. Have you had sex so far this year?

  • 42. How long can you just kiss until your hands start to wander?

  • 43. How long was your longest relationship?

  • 44. How many boyfriends/girlfriends have you had?

  • 45. How many people did you kiss in 2012/2013?

  • 46. How many times did you have sex last year?

  • 47. How old are you?

  • 48. If the person you like says they like someone else, what would you say?

  • 49. If you have a boyfriend/girlfriend, what is your favorite thing about him/her?

  • 50. If your first true love knocked on your door with apology and presents, would you accept?

  • 51. Is there a boy/girl who you would do absolutely everything for?

  • 52. Is there anyone you’ve given up on? Why?

  • 53. Is there someone mad because you’re dating/talking to the person you are?

  • 54. Is there someone you will never forget?

  • 55. Share a relationship story.

  • 56. State 8 facts about your body

  • 57. Things you want to say to an ex

  • 58. What are five ways to win your heart?

  • 59. What do you look like? (Post a picture!)

  • 60. What is the biggest age difference between you and any of your partners?

  • 61. What is the first thing you notice in someone?

  • 62. What is the sexiest thing someone could ever do for/to you?

  • 63. What is your definition of “having sex”?

  • 64. What is your definition of cheating?

  • 65. What is your favourite foreplay routine?

  • 66. What is your favourite roleplay?

  • 67. What is your idea of the perfect date?

  • 68. What is your sexual orientation?

  • 69. What turns you off?

  • 70. What turns you on?

  • 71. What was your kinkiest wet dream?

  • 72. What words do you like to hear during sex?

  • 73. What’s something sweet you’d like someone to do for you?

  • 74. What’s the most superficial characteristic you look for?

  • 75. What’s the sweetest thing anyone’s ever done for you?

  • 76. What’s the sweetest thing you’ve ever done for someone?

  • 77. What’s your opinion on age differences in relationships?

  • 78. What’s your dirtiest secret?

  • 79. When was the last time you felt jealous? Why?

  • 80. When was the last time you told someone you loved them?

  • 81. Who are five people you find attractive?

  • 82. Who is the last person you hugged?

  • 83. Who was your first kiss with?

  • 84. Why did your last relationship fail?

  • 85. Would you ever date someone off of the Internet?

dierwolf:

2014 was one of those years that started out like “THIS IS GOING TO BE GREAT!!!” and its halfway through and we have a war going on, a deadly disease has been spread, countless shootings have happened, racism is alive, more people have been leaving living things inside of hot cars, and robin williams is fucking dead

lovejustalittlebitharder:

friendly reminder that if i have ever befriended you and have not spoken to you in a while it’s nothing you’ve done wrong it’s just because i’m a piece of shit at keeping in contact with people and i still love you okay good

Thank goodness only 4 hours left. Then it’s off to do some chores, then maybe play some videos games before bed :p

Dear god I can hear a crying baby from the break room in the back of the store let’s hope I get to actually get off close to on time

Dear god I can hear a crying baby from the break room in the back of the store let’s hope I get to actually get off close to on time

So I got something to drink and realised that I’m hella shaky lol. I don’t know how long I’ve been doing this

Who's is your favorite doctor who companion?

Rose. I loved Amy and Rory, but I dunno I just really loved Rose. Maybe because she was my first companion she holds a special place in my heart.

5000letters:

i find it so incredibly attractive when someone is really good at something, like you can play the violin? damn son. you’re a really talented dj? good for you! i don’t care if you talk to me about quantum physics for an hour straight if i can see the passion in you at some point in that hour i’ll think “whoa, this is really hot.”